Ideas

In Australia, street artists turn grain silos into true works of art

How to transform grain silos basic and boring in real life masterpieceswork of ? These Australian street artists have found a solution that sublimates the landscape but also revive the tourism of small villages! A track of trail, which runs around thirty grain silos and allows to discover the different states of the continent. A superb and clever idea, which is already starting to bear fruit.

This track brings together the famous Australian collection "Silo Art", which stretches from the west of the continent, across the South, the states of Victoria and New South Wales, and then ends in Queensland. Since 2015, 25 silos were painted by urban artists, creating the largest outdoor art gallery! Spreading over 200 kilometersThis "Silo Art" track has increased tourism from small villages far from main roads, to small farms and local communities.

The project allows to make known the painters, sometimes children of the country, but also draws on the locals in order to realize epic works of art, which tell the unique history of the remote villages which shelter these silos, some dating even 30s!

The South Australian Trail begins with the silos of Coonalpyn, who are still in office. The artist Guido Van Helten, originally from Brisbane, spent a week chatting with the small local community there, and so decided to paint 5 children, students at the local elementary school. The silos of Guido represent the future of the village, and the artist hopes to inspire children creatively!

Then the road leads to Kimba, where the artist Cam Scale, from Melbourne, painted a young child in a wheat field at sunset. In this farming village, the silos light up at night; with the result, a magical rendering and very special.

Then to Tumby Bay, the silos were painted by the Argentine Martin Ron. He spent more than a week visiting the small town, where he discovered rather quickly the hobby of the locals ... jump from the pier! In 2014, photographer Robert Lang also captured two young men engaged in this activity and it is from here that Martin drew his inspiration for the design of visuals. This silo in particular was more complicated to realize because the visual is horizontal, and not vertical.

When at the silo Wirrabara, it's the artist Smug One who painted Dion Lebrun, a resident of Tumby Bay. The rest of the painting shows us the natural beauty of the region with its forests and two pretty robins.

Unlimited creativity, but especially respectful of the history of the regions where the silos are located! In short, a beautiful human and realistic tribute to all those inhabitants of Australia far from the big cities. What is certain is that the initiative will surely bring back the world on the track of all these silos: a creative circuit, to make a road trip as soon as possible, to discover the beautiful red lands of the continent down under !

Silos located in Wirrabara by the artist Smug One

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Silos located in Melbourne by artist Cam Scale

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Silos located in Brim by the artist Guido van Helten

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Silos located in Tumby Bay by artist Martin Ron

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Silos located in Coonalpyn by the artist Guido Van Helten

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Credits : Annette Green

Silos located in Patchewollock by the artist Fintan Magee

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Silos located in Sheep Hills by artist Adnate

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Credits : Silo Art Trail

Video: The Silo Art Trail (April 2020).

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